DD-Atelier is Closing and I am in MOURNING.

dd-atelier-closing

I wish I could go back in time and buy a black dress from DD-Atelier.

I have never mourned the passing of a clothing company before, but no other company has meant as much to me as this one has.

Understand that I love most of the companies I have mentioned in the short time I’ve been blogging.

Biubiu introduced me to the busty clothing world. Urkye fits me like a dream. Pinup Girl Clothing made my wedding magical. Naoko is a dream come true.

But DD-Atelier! DD-Atelier changed my life.

When I first discovered this company, the value of the Euro had more-or-less priced me out of ever purchasing anything. This changed around the summer of 2015, when I ordered my first item.

 

dd-atelier-tie-dye-dress

 

 

And . . . it didn’t fit. I couldn’t zip it past my flared ribcage, and as I’d foolishly convinced myself that I could somehow cardio my way into¬†losing a few inches of bone, I never returned the item.

It’s still hanging in my closet, tags attached, waiting for someone with a non-flared ribcage to purchase it.

So why did I order again? Because this piece was so creatively structured around the bust. Often, companies rely on princess seams or darts to accommodate a larger bust.

DD-Atelier took a different approach.

Each piece accommodates the bust in a uniquely flattering manner. Some, like the first item I purchased, utilized additional panels to create an architecturally perfect enclosure for larger busts.

And hey, some of them used princess lines as well — but with a precision that was downright artistic.

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More importantly, DD-Atelier was the rare busty line that offered so much more than cotton jersey basics and vintage-inspired numbers. They released basics, yes, but they also provided busty ladies with officewear, sundresses, winter coats, rain jackets, pajamas, evening gowns, cocktail attire, and more.

 

dd-atelier-white_cayenne_jacket

I cannot tell you how much I wish I’d purchased their suffragette suit when it was still in stock.

 

Certainly, the flawless construction of their clothing made me feel like every time I wore DD-Atelier was a special occasion, even if it was anything but. I’ve worn their clothing in job interviews, to meet with my wedding planner, and even on hikes.

 

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The Diva Dress. For divas, by divas.

 

While DD-Atelier had a “signature” collection that included classics like the Diva Dress and the Cayenne skirt set, I will always regard their team as innovators above all else.

 

dd-atelier_cayenne

The Cayenne is equal parts “flattering” and “professional.”

And here’s the saddest part: If the busty clothing world were larger, more profitable, and, let’s face it, less moral, DD-Atelier would have revolutionized the entire industry. Every other company would be copying their styles.

Substandard, mimeograph-quality pieces would be popping up in fast-fashion stores around the world.

Understand, I wouldn’t want that to happen. But I do wish that the small, creative, internationally successful companies that form the backbone of the busty clothing community would receive the accolades and recognition that they deserve.

These are companies that have never participated in Fashion Week. They don’t have name recognition in the wider fashion community.

 

But they make their customers happy. DD-Atelier made me feel beautiful every time I opened my closet.

So I want to honor their contributions to the bust community. I’ll devote a few posts here to the pieces I’ve purchased over the years, with the hope that other busty companies survive, and continue the tradition of creativity and innovation that DD-Atelier embodied.

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